News Ticker

STOP FEELING GUILTY ABOUT RELAXING

ARE YOU FEELING YOU’VE BEING PULLED IN 10 DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS ALL AT ONCE? IT’S TIME TO STOP AND ANALYZE ON HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR DOWNTIME AS JEN MUELLER GIVES US THE INSIGHT.


 

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

My days start early and are full of activity, whether it’s working, getting my four kids to and from where they need to be, or squeezing in daily chores and errands. Most of the time, I like it that way. I prefer to be on the go instead of sitting at home with nothing to do, but it has gotten to the point where I find it hard to remember how to really relax.

I know I’m not alone. When I ask moms at school, “How are things?” the answer I typically get is, “You know, busy as ever!” Life can be really stressful when you’re trying to juggle commitments to family, friends and work. Often, the commitment to yourself takes a backseat—but does it always have to be this way?

Yes, a lot of us have a lot going on. Sometimes I’m embarrassed by my inability to balance downtime for myself and work time for everyone else around me. It goes without saying that I’m busy juggling four young children, yet, there are people in my life (and probably yours, too) who seem equally busy and continue taking on more and more even though they seem to have reached their limit long ago. They aren’t afraid to share the constant and suffocating stresses in their daily lives; some appear to wear their busyness as a badge of honor, constantly talking about how frazzled and stressed out they are.

Lack of downtime leaves me feeling depleted, both physically and mentally.To avoid those feelings of regret, I’m proactively taking baby steps to become less frantic and more present now so that I can enjoy (or at least calmly manage) the craziness that surrounds me. Are you ready to do the same?

Implications of Not Taking Downtime

In addition to making you feel like you’re constantly being pulled in 10 different directions at once—believe me, I’ve been there—there are also physical and mental health issues that can arise from no downtime.

Prolonged periods of too much stress affects your hormones, increasing the level of cortisol—also known as the “stress hormone”—and decreasing the level of serotonin and dopamine in your body. These hormonal changes have been linked to depression in some people. Increased levels of cortisol can also affect your appetite, potentially leading to weight gain. Constant stress can also take a toll on your heart. Whether the stress is coming from work, family life, financial issues or other places, providing no outlet for those negative feelings can increase your risk of a heart attack.

Taking a time-out now and then, whether it’s a quick nap or a moment of meditation, gives your brain a chance to refresh and replenish. It improves productivity, creativity, increases your attention span and improves memory. A relaxed state increases blood flow to the brain and shifts brain waves from a beta (alert) to alpha (relaxed) rhythm. This state helps decrease anxiety, stress and worry in the body.

Getting Comfortable with Relaxing

Me-time-moments

Knowing that prolonged periods of stress with no relief isn’t good for your health, how do you get comfortable with taking downtime? Why is it so difficult to give ourselves permission to relax?

“Prolonged periods of too much stress affects your
hormones, increasing the level of cortisol—also known
as the “stress hormone”—and decreasing the level of
serotonin and dopamine in your body.”

Take a look at the tasks you have on your plate today. Can every single thing on that list really not wait? Are there any tasks you can delegate to others in order to free up small amounts of time for yourself? There is always going to be one more load of laundry to do or one more volunteer sign-up sheet, but sometimes it’s okay to decide to put yourself first.

If you feel like it’s important to stay too busy because of others’ perceptions, ask yourself why. Wouldn’t you rather people see you as a friend who is present and can take time to listen, or a patient parent who will spontaneously play dress-up or bake a batch of cookies with the kids? Even though it’s not always possible to stop what you’re doing and take time for more low-key activities, make that effort every now and then to keep yourself grounded and present in your life. Those around me don’t envy my busyness—most of the time, they probably think I’m a crazy lady who just takes on too much.

Even small changes can make a big difference in the quality of your life. Remember that learning to relax is a skill, so your ability to focus and make the most of your downtime will improve with practice. If one technique doesn’t work for you, try another until you find something that gives you the recharge we all need.

Jen Mueller is a SparkPeople Blogger, you can find her articles at: www.sparkspeople.com